lAB   

AT THE UNIVERSITY OF  SOUTH FLORIDA

Dr WHITTNEY BURDA, B.S., Ph.D. Whittney received her BS degree in microbiology with honors from the University of South Florida in 2010. During that time she worked on her honors thesis in the Shaw lab, focusing on antibacterial agents targeting MRSA. She joined the Ph.D. program in fall 2010, exploring the genetic mechanisms of SigmaS control in S. aureus, as well as the connection between SigS and the DNA damage response. She has also continued her works with novel antibacterial compounds. In 2012 Whittney was awarded the departmental outstanding graduate student researcher award. in 2014 Whittney was named as an inventor on a US Patent stemming from her work with novel antibacterial agents. She left the Shaw lab in summer of 2015, having successfully defended her dissertation. She is now a post-doctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr Roy Curtiss at the University of Florida.

KATIE PROSEN, B.S., M.S. Katie received her BS degree in microbiology from the University of South Florida in spring 2007. During that time she worked in the Dao lab, focusing on antibacterial agents targeting MRSA. She joined the CMMB M.S. program in fall 2007, working on novel N-thiolated-Beta-Lactams developed by the laboratory of Dr Ed Turos (Dept of Chemistry, USF). She graduated from the Shaw lab with her M.S. degree in the fall of 2010, before taking up a position at Avatar Energy in Burlington, Vermont. Since then, Katie has held positions at ExcelImmune, Joule Unlimited and Brigham and Women's Hospital at Harvard. Katie is currently a staff scientist at the Novartis Institute of Biomedical Research in the San Francisco Bay area working on the development of novel antibacterial agents.

Dr CHRISTINA KRUTE, B.S., Ph.D. Christina received her BS degree in biology with honors from the University of South Florida in 2010. For her honors thesis, she performed transposon mutagenesis to understand the components that influence sigS expression in S. aureus. Christina joined the Ph.D. program in fall 2010, with her graduate work centering on mechanisms of post-translational regulation in S. aureus; with a specific interest in post-translational modifications and proteolysis. During her time in the Shaw lab, Christina presented her work at a wealth of conferences, including the International Conference on Gram-Positive Pathogens and the Gordon Research Conference on Staphylococcal Diseases. She successfully defended her dissertation in the summer of 2015, before taking up a post-doctoral position in the laboratory of Dr Jeff Bose at the University of Kansas Medical School.

​MIGUEL TREMBLAY, B.S, M.S. Miguel obtained a B.S. degree in microbiology from the University of South Florida in 2014. He then earned an MS degree at USF, also in microbiology, in 2015. During both his undergraduate and graduate work he engaged in research alongside PhD student Andy Weiss, focusing on the mechanisms of transcriptional and translational regulation in S. aureus. Miguel continues to perform research in the Shaw lab, developing his Molecular HAMR technique, as he waits to attend medical school.

DEVON MARKING, B.S., M.S. Devon received her BS in microbiology from the University of South Florida in 2012. After this she took time to travel Europe, before returning to Tampa, and volunteering in the Shaw lab. During this time, she was trained by Andy, working on a number of projects focusing on molecular regulation in S. aureus. She joined the lab as an M.S. student in fall 2013, where her research focused on understanding how intracellular aminopeptidases influence the ability of S. aureus to cause disease. She successfully defended her thesis in the Spring of 2015, and remained in the Shaw group for a time as our laboratory manager. At the end of 2015 she joined the USF Health Informatics Institute as a Research Compliance Administrator for clinical trials targeting ALS Disease.

ANASTACIA PARKS, B.S., M.S. Anastacia earned a combined B.S.-M.S. degree in microbiology from the University of South Florida in 2014-2015. During the last semester of her undergraduate studies, she performed research with our former postdoc, Ronan Carroll, understanding virulence determinant regulation in S. aureus. During her non-thesis MS degree she continued to engage in research, working with former Shaw lab PhD student Christina Krute on the prenylation pathway of S. aureus. She left USF, in the Summer of 2015 to enroll as a doctoral student in the Department of Microbiology at the University of Georgia. She is currently performing her dissertation research in the laboratory of Dr Jorge Escalante.

FRANCES RIVERA, B.S., M.S. Frances was the first student to join Shaw lab in the fall of 2007 as an undergraduate honors student. During this time she worked on the HtrA membrane proteases of S. aureus, and their role in post-translational modifications. After finishing her B.S. degree in microbiology in spring 2008, she stayed on in the Shaw lab to complete an M.S. degree in microbiology as well. During her graduate work, Frances developed and refined techniques for proteomic analysis in S. aureus, in collaboration with her co-mentor, Dr Stanley Stevens (CMMB, USF). Upon graduating with her M.S. degree in the fall of 2010, Frances took up the position of lab manager in the Shaw lab, attempting to bring order to seeming never-ending chaos. She finally left the Shaw lab in the summer of 2014, taking up the position of science teacher at the John I. Leonard High School in Greenacres, FL.

Dr STACEY KOLAR, B.S., Ph.D. Stacey received her BS degree in microbiology from the University of South Florida in summer 2008. She joined the Shaw laboratory as a doctoral student in fall 2008, where her projects focusing on the influence of two-component systems on the regulatory circuits of S. aureus; and the role of staphylococcal extracellular proteases as regulators of pathogenesis. In 2011 Stacey was awarded the departmental outstanding graduate student researcher award. During her time in the Shaw lab Stacey published multiple papers, many of which are now highly cited, and presented her work at numerous conferences, including the International Conference on Gram-Positive Pathogens and the Gordon Research Conference on Staphylococcal Diseases.  Upon graduating in the summer of 2012 Stacey moved to the laboratory of Dr George Liu at Cedars-Sinai as a post-doc where her work focusses on bacterial hyaluronidases in immune evasion.

Dr Halie Miller, B.S., Ph.D. Halie was the first graduate student to join the Shaw lab in the spring of 2008, having previously earned a BS degree in microbiology, with a minor in chemistry, from the University of Florida in 2006. Her doctoral work centered on the role of SigmaS in the stress and virulence responses of S. aureus. She published multiple papers and presented her work at numerous conferences during her time in the Shaw lab. Halie graduated in the summer of 2012, moving to the laboratory of Dr Victoria Auerbach Stone at the University of Santa-Cruz as a post-doc. After a successful stint in California, Halie briefly returned to the Shaw lab as a post-doc during the fall of 2014 and spring of 2015. Following this, Halie moved to Atlanta, and is now a post-doctoral associate at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the Q-fever laboratory of Dr Gilbert Kersh.

RALLYA TELUSSA, B.S., M.S.P.H.  Rallya earned her bachelors degree in Biology, with a focus in Microbiology, from Pattimura University, Indonesia in 2012. During this time she performed undergraduate research on the antibacterial activity of a variety of natural products. Upon finishing her studies in Indonesia, she was awarded a scholarship from USAID to pursue her Masters degree in the United States. Rallya joined the MSPH program in the USF Department of Global Health, performing her thesis research in the Shaw lab. Her work focussed on the development of novel Rifampin, Ciprofloxacin and Penicillin derivatives in collaboration with the Turos lab (USF Dept of Chemistry). She successfully defended her MSPH in Summer of 2016.

Dr Jose Antonio Ibarra, BS, Ph.D. Antonio earned a BS degree in microbiology and parasitology from the National School of Biological Sciences at the National Polytechnic Institute (ENCB) in Mexico City, Mexico. His thesis focused on the attachment of multiple diarrheagenic E. coli strains to cultured epithelial cells. He received his Masters degree in Microbiology also at ENCB, using molecular probes to detect virulence genes in clinical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) isolates. From here he moved to the nearby city of Cuernavaca to pursue a PhD in the Biotechnology Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico. There he worked under the mentorship of Dr. Jose Luis Puente on the regulation of pilus formation in EPEC. After his PhD he stayed in the Puente lab working aspects of EPEC gene regulation, before moving to the US for a post-doctoral position at the Rocky Mountains Laboratory of the NIH. There he trained in the laboratory of Dr. Olivia Steele-Mortimer, working on regulation of the type III secretion systems in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In 2011 Antonio joined the Shaw laboratory as a postdoc, where he worked on transcriptional regulation in the context of virulence in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). During the winter of 2012, he was recruited back to his alma mater at ENCB in Mexico City as an Assistant Professor. Here he works in the Laboratory of Microbial Genetics in the Department of Microbiology, and continues his work on microbial gene regulation in pathogenic organisms. 

FORMER GRADUATE STUDENTS

Dr Ronan Carroll, BA (Hons), Ph.D. Ronan earned his BA in microbiology from Trinity College Dublin in Ireland in 1999. Following this, he performed doctoral research in the laboratory of Dr Charlie Dorman, also at Trinity College Dublin, focussing on the regulation of virulence mechanisms in Salmonella. He then moved to the United States, as a postdoctoral research associate in the laboratory of Dr Linda Kenney at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he continued his work on the pathogenic mechanisms of Salmonella. In 2008 he joined the laboratory of Dr James Musser at Methodist Hospital Research Institute in Houston, TX, as postdoc, where his research centered on comparative genomics and transcriptomics in group A streptococci. Ronan joined the Shaw laboratory in late 2010, transitioning to S. aureus, and specifically focussing on how the bio-activation/inactivation of proteins (via proteolysis) influences intracellular signaling cascades and virulence processes. In addition to this, Ronan also pioneered the Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) efforts of the Shaw lab, setting up our transcriptomics/genomics suite, and developing protocols for genome sequencing and RNAseq. He used these technologies to great effect in numerous studies, and is now a leading expert in the field of prokaryotic NGS. He left Shaw lab in the fall of 2014 to take up an Assistant Professor position in the Department of Biological Sciences at the Ohio University, Athens, OH. Here his lab (www.CarrollLab.com) uses NGS to explore the pathogenic potential of S. aureus.

FORMER POSTDOCS

​JODIE NUNEZ, B.S, M.S. Jodie obtained B.S and M.S. degrees in Microbiology from the University of South Florida in 2014 and 2015, respectively, as part of our accelerated program. During her graduate degree she engaged in research alongside M.S. student Rahmy Tawfik, focusing on the isolation, screening and epigenetic modification of Actinobacteria for the development of novel therapeutics. Jodie has now moved into academic administration, serving as our departmental graduate program coordinator.